Podobnie ak tysiące innych, est dostępna on-line na stronie



Yüklə 5,03 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/137
tarix06.05.2018
ölçüsü5,03 Kb.
#42969
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   137



 
 
Ta lektura
, podobnie ak tysiące innych, est dostępna on-line na stronie
wolnelektury.pl
.
Utwór opracowany został w ramach pro ektu
Wolne Lektury
przez
fun-
dac ę Nowoczesna Polska
.
BRONISŁAW MALINOWSKI
Argonauts of the Western Pacific
         
   
o
frien an teacher rofessor
e ig an
    . 
My esteemed iend, Dr. B. Malinowski has asked me to write a preface to his book,
and I willingly comply with his request, though I can hardly think that any words of
mine will add to the value of the remarkable record of anthropological research which
he has given us in this volume. My observations, such as they are, will deal partly with
the writer’s method and partly with the matter of his book.
In regard to method, Dr. Malinowski has done his work, as it appears to me, under
the best conditions and in the manner calculated to secure the best possible results. Both
by theoretical training and by practical experience he was well equipped for the task which
he undertook. Of his theoretical training he had given proof in his learned and thoughtful
treatise on the family among the aborigines of Australia¹; of his practical experience he
had produced no less satisfactory evidence in his account of the natives of Mailu in New
Guinea², based on a residence of six months among them. In the Trobriand Islands, to
the east of New Guinea, to which he next turned his attention, Dr. Malinowski lived
as a native among the natives for many months together, watching them daily at work
and at play, conversing with them in their own tongue, and deriving all his information
om the surest sources — personal observation and statements made to him directly
by the natives in their own language without the intervention of an interpreter. In this
way he has accumulated a large mass of materials, of high scientific value, bearing on
the social, religious, and economic or industrial life of the Trobriand Islanders. These he
hopes and intends to publish hereaer in full; meantime he has given us in the present
volume a preliminary study of an interesting and peculiar feature in Trobriand society,
the remarkable system of exchange, only in part economic or commercial, which the
islanders maintain among themselves and with the inhabitants of neighbouring islands.
Little reflection is needed to convince us of the fundamental importance of economic
forces at all stages of man’s career om the humblest to the highest. Aer all, the human
species is part of the animal creation, and as such, like the rest of the animals, it reposes
on a material foundation; on which a higher life, intellectual, moral, social, may be
built, but without which no such superstructure is possible. That material foundation,
consisting in the necessity of food and of a certain degree of warmth and shelter om
the elements, forms the economic or industrial basis and prime condition of human
life. If anthropologists have hitherto unduly neglected it, we may suppose that it was
rather because they were attracted to the higher side of man’s nature than because they
deliberately ignored and undervalued the importance and indeed necessity of the lower. In
excuse for their neglect we may also remember that anthropology is still a young science,
and that the multitude of problems which await the student cannot all be attacked at
once, but must be grappled with one by one. Be that as it may, Dr. Malinowski has
¹treatise on the fa i a ong the a origines of Austra ia — he a i a ong the Austra ian A origines A o
cio ogica tu . London University of London Press, . [przypis edytorski]
²account of the nati es of
ai u in
e
uinea — he
ati es of
ai u Pre i inar
esu ts of the o ert
on
esearch Wor in ritish e
uinea. „Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia”, vol. xxxix.,
. [przypis edytorski]


done well to emphasise the great significance of primitive economics by singling out the
notable exchange system of the Trobriand Islanders for special consideration.
Further, he has wisely refused to limit himself to a mere description of the processes
of the exchange, and has set himself to penetrate the motives which underlie it and the
feelings which it excites in the minds of the natives. It appears to be sometimes held
that pure sociology should confine itself to the description of acts and should leave the
problems of motives and feelings to psychology. Doubtless it is true that the analysis of
motives and feelings is logically distinguishable om the description of acts, and that
it falls, strictly speaking, within the sphere of psychology; but in practice an act has no
meaning for an observer unless he knows or infers the thoughts and emotions of the
agent; hence to describe a series of acts, without any reference to the state of mind of
the agent, would not answer the purpose of sociology, the aim of which is not merely to
register but to understand the actions of men in society. Thus sociology cannot fulfil its
task without calling in at every turn the aid of psychology.
It is characteristic of Dr. Malinowski’s method that he takes full account of the
complexity of human nature. He sees man, so to say, in the round and not in the flat.
He remembers that man is a creature of emotion at least as much as of reason, and he
is constantly at pains to discover the emootional as well as the rational basis of human
action. The man of science, like the man of letters, is too apt to view mankind only
in the abstract, selecting for his consideration a single side of our complex and many-
-sided being. Of this one-sided treatment Molière is a conspicuous example among great
writers. All his characters are seen only in the flat: one of them is a miser, another
a hypocrite, another a coxcomb, and so on; but not one of them is a man. All are dummies
dressed up to look very like human beings; but the likeness is only on the surface, all
within is hollow and empty, because truth to nature has been sacrificed to literary effect.
Very different is the presentation of human nature in the greater artists, such as Cervantes
and Shakespeare: their characters are solid, being drawn not om one side only but om
many. No doubt in science a certain abstractness of treatment is not merely legitimate,
but necessary, since science is nothing but knowledge raised to the highest power, and
all knowledge implies a process of abstraction and generalisation: even the recognition of
an individual whom we see every day is only possible as the result of an abstract idea of
him formed by generalisation om his appearances in the past. Thus the science of man
is forced to abstract certain aspects of human nature and to consider them apart om
the concrete reality; or ratter it falls into a number of sciences, each of which considers
a single part of man’s complex organism, it may be the physical, the intellectual, the
moral, or the social side of his being; and the general conclusions which it draws will
present a more or less incomplete picture of man as a whole, because the lines which
compose it are necessarily but a few picked out of a multitude.
In the present treatise Dr. Malinowski is mainly concerned with what at first sight
might seem a purely economic activity of the Trobriand Islanders; but, with his usual
width of outlook and fineness of perception, he is careful to point out that the curious
circulation of valuables, which takes place between the inhabitants of the Trobriand and
other islands, while it is accompanied by ordinary trade, is by no means itself a purely
commercial transaction; he shows that it is not based on a simple calculation of utility,
of profit and loss, but that it satisfies emotional and aesthetic needs of a higher order
than the mere gratification of animal wants. This leads Dr. Malinowski to pass some
severe strictures on the conception of the Primitive Economic Man as a kind of bogey
who, it appears, still haunts economic text-books and even extends his blighting influ-
ence to the minds of certain anthropologists. Rigged out in cast-off garments of Mr.
Jeremy Bentham and Mr. Gradgrind, this horrible phantom is apparently actuated by
no other motive than that of filthy lucre, which he pursues relentlessly, on Spencerian
principles, along the line of least resistance. If such a dismal fiction is really regarded by
serious inquirers as having any counterpart in savage society, and not simply as a useful
abstraction, Dr. Malinowski’s account of the u a in this book should help to lay the
phantom by the heels; for he proves that the trade in useful ob ects, which forms part
of the u a system, is in the minds of the natives entirely subordinate in importance to
the exchange of other ob ects, which serve no utilitarian purpose whatever. In its combi-
  
Argonauts of the Western Pacific




Yüklə 5,03 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   137




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə