Niobium and tantalum



Yüklə 136,8 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix02.03.2018
ölçüsü136,8 Kb.
#29382


NIOBIUM AND TANTALUM

NIOBIUM

Niobium  is  a  soft  silvery-grey  metal  that  resembles  fresh-cut  steel.  It  neither 

tarnishes  nor  oxidizes  in  air  at  room  temperature  because  of  a  thin  coating 

of  niobium  oxide.  It  does  readily  oxidize  at  high  temperatures  (above  200ºC), 

particularly with oxygen and halogens. Niobium is not attacked by cold acids but 

is very reactive with several hot acids such as hydrochloric, sulphuric, nitric, and 

phosphoric acids. It is ductile and malleable [23]. The European Union has recently 

identified Niobium as critical raw material.

SHORT DESCRIPTION

FACTSHEET

Multi-Stakeholder Platform for a Secure 

Supply of Refractory Metals in Europe

MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

Fig. 1. Niobium metal



TANTALUM

Tantalum (Ta) is a dense, tough and ductile element with very high melting point of 

3017ºC. It is also highly corrosion-resistant to most acids below 150ºC and, in most 

cases, chemically inert. It has good thermal and electrical conducting properties 

and  is  easy  to  machine  [16]. Tantalum  has  not  been  placed  on  the  critical  raw 

materials list as of yet, but it is strategically important in several industries.

Fig. 2 Tantalum metal 

APPLICATIONS

NIOBIUM

The main application of Niobium is in high-strength low-alloy steels (HSLA), where Niobium is added as Ferro-Niobium. 

This market accounts for 90% of Niobium usage and is responsible for most of the increase in overall consumption. The 

next table shows the main Niobium applications [1] [2]:

Table 1. Main Nb applications



Ferro-Niobium and Nickel-Niobium are applied in super-alloys used in the aerospace industry, particularly in commercial 

aircraft engines, as well as in land-based gas turbines for electricity generation, and in corrosion-resistant alloys. Titanium 

and Zirconium Niobium alloys are used in aeronautics, superconductors and nuclear energy.


Niobium chemicals are applied in many fields such as catalysts and functional ceramics, but information concerning the 

Niobium grades that are employed in specific individual applications is scarce.

MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

Fig. 3 Niobium applications



TANTALUM

Tantalum is used in different sectors of the industry thanks to its corrosion-resistant qualities and its applicability as 

capacitor, the latter being the most important application, with billions of units produced every year. Other applications 

in electric and electronic equipment (EEE) are sputtering targets (Ta metal, Ta

2

O

5

, TaN) and surface acoustic wave filters, 

of which the applications are cellular and wireless telephones, television sets, video recorders, tire pressure control and 

keyless entry systems [5]. Tantalum is also used for high temperature applications, e.g. aircraft engines, in the form of 

super alloys based on nickel and cobalt. Tantalum carbide is used for the fabrication of cemented carbides. Tantalum 

oxide is used for manufacturing of special types of glass. 

Fig. 4 Tantalum applications, Source: Roskill 2013 in Minor Metals Conference




NIOBIUM

90% of the world's Niobium is produced by three 

mines,  two  of which  are  in  Brazil  (the Araxá  and 

Catalao  mines)  and  the  other  in  Canada  (the 

Niobec  mine).  The  vast  majority  of  the  world's 

Niobium reserves are in these countries and there 

are  currently  no  Niobium-mining  operations  in 

Europe.

MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

EU SUPPLY AND DEMAND: CURRENT AND FUTURE

Fig. 5 Niobium production worlwide

Statistics on imports to the EU EU of Niobium and Tantalum-containing slags, ashes and residues from 2011 to 2015 are 

shown in Fig. 6 [4].Exporting flows and importing and exporting wastes containing Niobium in this period were almost 

zero. 

Fig. 6 Imports to the EU of Nb- and Ta-containing materials



Niobium is mainly imported and exported as Ferro-Niobium: 

Fig. 7. EU FeNb imports and exports, 2010-2015 




MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Total production

85984

53520

83895

88918

57532

54574

59700

Total EU imports

22871

12107

20249

21902

21960

22774

43016

% EU 

26.6

22.62

24.14

24.63

38.17

41.73

72.05

Table 2. EU import quantities as a percentage of total FeNb production

Fig. 8 EU FeNb imports 2000-2015 (BGS Statistics)

Ferro-Niobium imports to the EU have risen every year since 2009, after the decrease recorded between 2007 and 

2009, which probably occurred as a result of the poor economic situation which led to a fall in demand for automobiles 

and structural steel for the consturction industry. Ferro-Niobium imports to the EU rose considerably in 2014, mainly 

as a result of the large quantities of Ferro-Niobium imported by Spain (20,093 tons). If Spain's imports had not been 

taken into account, total EU demand would have been 22,923 (based on date from the previous years) and would have 

increased in 2015.

Sharp growth in demand is expected between now and 2020 for Ferro-Niobium (over 8% per year), driven by a global 

demand  for  steel  in  construction,  infrastructure  and  automotive  applications,  and  a  trend  towards  increased  use  of 

HSLA steels. Increasing demand for natural gas is also expected to result in increased demand for pipeline steel [26]. 

ArcelorMittal, whose headquarters are in Luxembourg, is the world's leading steel maker (96.1 million tonnes of crude 

steel production in 2013). ThyssenKrupp in Germany is also among the world's leading steel makers (15.9 million tonnes 

of crude steel production in 2013). Therefore, it is clear that, given the current economic situation, the demand for 

Ferro-Niobium in the EU will remain high. The graph below shows annual Ferro-Niobium demand projections based on 

an average increase in demand of 8% per year ([27]):

Fig. 9 Estimated FeNb demand from 2016 to 2025




MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

TANTALUM

Rwanda  provided  almost  50%  of  2013  worldwide 

production  of  concentrate.  Other  countries,  such  as 

Congo and Brazil, played lesser but still significant roles 

(16.56%  and  12.58%,  respectively).  The  European 

Union's  contribution  to  the  world  production  of 

Tantalum  concentrate  was  low.  The  only  primary 

production  of  Tantalum  came  from  the  Echassières 

kaolin  quarry  (in  France),  which  in  2011  produced 

55 tonnes of Sn-Ta-Nb concentrate at 10% Ta

2

0

5

, i.e 

Fig. 10 Tantalum production worldwide



around 4.5 tonnes of Ta [5].

In 2014, 375 tons of capacitors were imported by the EU, and 415 tons were exported. The EU 28 export more wastes 

and scraps than they import (+ 94 tons) but they import huge amounts (21,575 tons) of slag, ash and residues containing 

mainly Tantalum and Niobium, mainly from Malaysia (20,862 tons in 2014).

There is currently no data available on EU production or transformation of Tantalum. Roskill does not make any assessment 

for Europe in its market reviews and the Tantalum-Niobium International Study Center (TIC) states that there are no 

figures for the EU market, as its members are “unable to provide this level of information”. This lack of transparency 

could be related to the fact that Europe imports Tantalum extracted in conflict-affected countries in Central Africa, which 

underscores the fact that it is a very fragile and small market with very few actors [27].

EU  Tantalum  consumption  is  roughly  estimated  to  lie  between  between  a  quarter  and  a  third  of  total  worldwide 

production, i.e. between 250 and 330 tons [Hocquard ,2016], if a global production figure of 1,000 tons is assumed for 

2015 [27].

So far, Europe has not encountered any supply problems, but as demand for Tantalum is expected to grow, different 

options could be studied to improve supply chain security [27], including:

•  Improving recycling rates, focusing not only on old scraps (cemented carbides and alloys) but also on end-of-

life products containing high-grade Tantalum (electrolytic capacitors: 36.7%, wavefilters: 33%, semiconductors: 

28.6%).

•  Exploitation  of  old  tin  tailings  containing  Tantalum  (or  Niobium)  in  metal  extraction  procedures,  using  new 

technologies.

•  Exploitation of new deposits, especially in Australia which had 49% of estimated Tantalum reserves in 2015. There 

are also resources to be exploited in the EU, among which Treguennec in France represents a potential source of 

1,600 tons of Tantalum. 

Substitution of Tantalum in the manufacture of capacitors is simple and could mitigate Tantalum supply-and-demand 

issues in the future. There is no real supply risk for EU industries, but the situation could change if tighter regulations 

are placed on importation of supplies from conflict-affected regions and countries with poor working conditions and if 

environmental concerns are fully addressed. Finally, more transparency among EU processors will be required if the EU's 

needs and weaknesses are to be properly assessed [27].

PRIMARY RESOURCES

Tantalum  usually  occurs  together  with  Niobium  in  the  same  type  of  mineral  deposits  and  in  minerals  of  similar 

characteristics. These metals are often found in solid solutions, as is the case with columbite-tantalite, represented by 

the formula (Fe,Mg,Mn)(Nb,Ta)

2

O

6

, or minerals from the pyrochlore group. Mineral deposits from which Tantalum is 

extracted are associated with specific igneous rocks: Carbonatites and associated rocks, alkaline with peralkaline granites 

and syenites, and pegmatites. The weathering of these deposit types can result in other types of Niobium – Tantalum

MAIN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY RESOURCES




mineral deposits, as laterites concentrating pyrochlore, and alluvial deposits (placers). This is the case with the Araxá 

deposit, which is managed by CBMM (major worldwide Niobium producer).

•  Carbonatites and associated rocks: rarely contain profitable concentrations of Tantalum, neither as a by-product. 

They are mainly sources of Niobium.

•  Alkaline granite and syenites:  Tantalum can occasionally be obtained as a by–product.

•  Pegmatites: more widespread throughout the world. The main Niobium and Tantalum minerals in this type of 

deposits are columbite-tantalite series. 

Although the largest Tantalum reserves are located in Brazil and Australia, the combination of demand issues, lack of 

control over production and sale, and small-scale mining has led to continued domination by the countries in Africa's 

Great Lakes Region in recent years. 

The main economical ores for Tantalum and Niobium production are:

Table 3 Main economical ores for Ta and Nb production



SECONDARY RESOURCES

Niobium 

Niobium can be extracted as by-product of tin smelter waste or extracted from sludge from the cemented carbide tool 

industry or from mill scrap from alloyed and unalloyed metal fabrication and scrap from industrial alloys and superalloys.

Concerning end-of-life products, Niobium is found in [3]: 

•  Waste  electric  and  electronic  equipment  (WEEE).  It  was  estimated  that  a  computer  can  contain  0.0002%  of 

Niobium. The amount of Niobium recovered from collected IT and telecommunications equipment could be as 

high as 1.2 tonnes, and the grade of Niobium in PCB is about 36 g/t. 

•  End-of-life Vehicles. The grade of Niobium in ELV can be estimated thanks to the grades of Niobium used in 

stainless steels, which is in the range of 0.04-0.08%. 

Potential sources for Niobium recovery are mostly steels, but the Niobium content is low (<0.5% in weight). 

Among the companies in Europe that have been identified as Niobium recyclers are: Buss&Buss Spezialmetalle GmbH, 

Innova Recycling GmbH, Jean Goldshmidt International SA, Metherma KG, ELG Utica Alloys Ltd, Metallum Metal Trading 

AG (Minor Metal Trade Association, Ta-Nb international study centre).

Tantalum

Tantalum can be extracted as a by-product of tin smelter waste. Tin smelter waste typically contains 8 to 10 per cent 

tantalum oxide, but can sometimes be as high as 30%. Low grade smelter waste can be upgraded by electrothermic 

reduction yielding a synthetic concentrate with up to 50% Tantalum and Niobium. In the EU, potential tailings and slags 

The natural co-occurrence of Tantalum and Niobium in Ta-bearing ores explains their co-production form primary resources. 

Tantalite is the primary mineral for industrial production of Tantalum (being called ferrotantalite or manganotantalite 

depending on the presence of Fe or Mn). Tantalum-free Niobium can be found the mineral pyrochlore (NaCaNb

2

O

6

F). 

MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram


MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

can  be  found  in  Spain,  Portugal,  France,  the  UK, 

Germany and the Czech Republic. Tantalum can also 

be found in waste from uranium mining operations. 

Tantalum  can  also  be  extracted  from  municipal 

waste  landfills,  industrial  landfills  (WEEE  recycling 

companies) and incineration slags. 

Other potential sources are scrap from manufacturing 

of  Tantalum  powders  and  ingots  as  well  as 

manufacturing  of  Tantalum-containing  products  and 

end-of-life  scrap  containing  Tantalum.  Fig.  4  shows 

Tantalum sources in 2011 (%Ta

2

O

5

).

Fig. 6. Primary Tantalum Supply 2011



PRIMARY RESOURCES

Mining technology

The size and grade of the ore, the depth and the distribution of the ore minerals (disseminated or concentrated) and 

the geotechnical properties of the rock, are the main factors taken into account for the type of mining: open pit or 

underground. Almost all mines in carbonatites and other steeply-dipping intrusive rock structures are mined in open 

pits. The Araxá mine starts mining in the most surficial weathered part of the deposit, whereas the Niobec mine employs 

only underground mining techniques. Underground mining is restricted to deep deposits (the Tanco mine in Canada, the 

Greenbushes mine in Australia, for example, for Tantalum extraction). 

Processing technologies

Industrial beneficiation of the ores on an industrial scale relies upon the combination of: 

•  Crushing (jaw, cone or impact crusher) to say <15-20 mm

•  Grinding (ball or rod milling) and classification (screens and hydrocyclones) in closed circuit to <1mm

•  Conventional (jig, shaking table), centrifugal (spiral) and enhanced gravity separation (MGS, Falcon concentrator), 

depending on the size of the liberated particles. 

•  Selective  reverse  flotation  in  order  to  concentrate  the  finest  material,  normally  at  controlled  pH.  The  high 

consumption of additives is a significant cost factor for the flotation processing of Ta-Nb fines, and represent a 

pollution issue as well.

•  Regular and high magnetic separation to remove companion magnetic phases.

•  Thickening circuit to recycle the process water. 

Extractive Metallurgy

•  Hydro-metallurgy

o  Leaching: Acid digestion of ores in a mixture of hydrofluoric acid with other mineral acids, generally sulphuric 



acid.

o  Fractional Crystallization: Separation should preferably  be conducted at an acid concentration of about 1 to 



7% HF, where the solubility of Niobium complex is nearly 10 to 12 times that of Tantalum. Apart from acidity, 

many other factors, such as temperature and the presence of other ionic species, affect the solubility of the 

complex species. The separation of Niobium and Tantalum by fractional crystallization is achievable due to their 

double fluoride complexes with potassium.

MAIN PROCESSING AND EXTRACTING TECHNIQUES 




As the solubility of potassium fluotantalate (K2TaF7) is low, it crystallizes out. The crystalline solid is redissolved 

and  recrystallized.  The  process  is  conducted  in  several  stages.  The  process  works  quite  satisfactorily  and 

relatively easily as far as the preparation of pure tantalum complex K2TaF7 is concerned. The process flow 

sheet is shown to the right.

Fig. 11 Crystallization process for Nb and Ta production 

o  MIBK extraction: The key parameter is H+ concentration, which controls the degree of separation as well as 

the recovery of the two metals. Normally, operated mixer-settlers are used. Niobium and Tantalum remain in 

the organic phase, in which they are cleaned with concentrated sulphuric acid and re-extracted with water or 

dilute sulphuric acid to obtain Niobium. Niobium oxide hydrate is then precipitated using gaseous or aqueous 

ammonia  and  is  subsequently  filtrated,  dried  and  calcined  at  up  to  1100  ºC. The  precipitation,  drying  and 

calcination  parameters  can  be  modified  to  obtain  different  particle  sizes  of  the  oxides,  depending  on  the 

desired application. Impurities are not extracted and are left in the raffinate. Very pure Ta and Nb products are 

obtained. The process flow sheet is  shown to the right:

Fig. 12 MIBK extraction process for Nb and Ta production



MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram


o  Pyro-metallurgy: The pyrochlore concentrate obtained after physical beneficiation followed by chemical 

leaching to remove impurities is of the right specification and it can be used directly for the production of 

Ferro-Niobium through an aluminothermic reduction process.

One  of  the  simplest  methods  for  breakdown  treatment  of  Niobium  concentrates  is  direct  reduction  with 

aluminium and carbon, with or without the addition of iron and iron oxides. In aluminothermy, all the oxides 

that have free energy of formation which  are less negative than that of alumina are reduced to the metallic 

state and form ferroalloys, particularly Ferro-Niobium alloys. In carbothermic reduction, Niobium reacts with 

excess carbon and forms carbides, which in turn form an alloy carbide. This process is usually performed in a 

smelting electric arc furnace.

However, if the objective is to separate Tantalum from Niobium, a selective reduction of the chlorides can be 

applied. Niobium pentachloride is more readily reduced by hydrogen (or by metals such as aluminium) to the 

lower chlorides.  NbCl

5

 reduction is then performed at 450-550ºC to form a trichloride. TaCl

5

 is not reduced 

under these conditions.

Fig. 13 Pyro-metallurgy process for Nb and Ta extraction from concentrates



EXTRACTION OF TANTALUM FROM SECONDARY RESOURCES:

Mineral processing

•  Municipal and Industrial Landfill waste: The first stages include crushing and separation of fines from larger particles 

using a rotary screen, for example. The typical methods employed are the magnetic, density and ballistic separation 

methods or, in some cases, the eddy current method is used. 

•  Incineration bottom ash: Usually the slag is treated at the incineration plant. Before treatment, the slag is stored at 

least one day for integration of CO

2

 and to make it less wet and sticky. Metal pieces and particles are separated 

by several mechanical processing stages: sieving, crushing and mechanical separation (magnetic, eddy current). 

Sensor separators are also used. 

•  Tin slags and silt-like tailings: Strong chemical digestion or electro-thermic reduction are usually required.

MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram


Extractive metallurgy

•  Hydrometallurgy: the organic solvents than can be used in Niobium and Tantalum extraction are of two categories: 



1) neutral oxygen-containing extractants, such as ketones, TBP, TOPO or octanol, and 2) anion exchangers, such as 

trioctylamine (TOA). Industrially, MIBK, cyclohexanone, TBP and 2-octanol are used. Generally, the extraction and 

refining of Tantalum is accomplished through hydrofluoric and sulphuric acid leaching at high temperatures, which 

produces complex fluorides. After filtration and solvent extraction (MIBK) or ion exchange (amine extractant in 

kerosene), highly purified solutions of Tantalum and Niobium are produced. Tantalum values in the solution are 

generally converted into potassium tantalum fluoride or tantalum oxide. 

•  Pyrometallurgy:  Tantalum  oxidizes  easily  and  moves  into  the  slag  produced  in  pyro-metallurgical  processes. 



By using electrothermic  reduction process,  the slag  is  upgraded to a Tantalum-oxide  content as  high  as  50%.  

Carbothermic, metallothermic, and hydrogen reduction can be applied to extract Tantalum. Molten salt electrolysis 

is is also applied. After being subjected to these processes, Tantalum metal can be refined by molten salt electro-

refining, vacuum sintering, electron beam or plasma processes.

MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

EXTRACTION OF NIOBIUM FROM SECONDARY RESOURCES:

Mineral processing

Tin smelting slags are generally upgraded by a pyrometallurgical process, involving the production of ferroalloy called 

block metal, which acts as a collector for Niobium and Tantalum. The block metal is further upgraded through simple 

acid leaching or by a combination of oxidative smelting followed by acid leaching of the slag derived from the second 

smelting. The upgraded slag is used for the extraction of Niobium and Tantalum using hydrofluoric acid.

Extractive metallurgy 

Well-classified metal scrap can be reused by pulverizing it after hydriding, applying acid leaching to remove iron conta-

mination, if there is any, and then reusing it in the fabrication stream. Similarly, well-classified scrap of cemented carbide 

tools consisting primarily of a low carbide cemented with a cobalt binder can be reused in the fabrication plant after 

separating the carbides from the cementing material. This can be achieved by a simple process involving treatment of 

the scrap with molten zinc. Cobalt and zinc form an alloy which has a higher specific volume, which disintegrates the ce-

mented carbide shapes. The carbide powder can thus be reused and cobalt can be recovered through vacuum distillation 

of zinc. 

Niobium and Tantalum separation by solvent extraction is normally performed in the presence of fluorides. Sulphuric and 

hydrochloric acid solutions are characterized by association and polymerization of complexes of these elements, which 

prevent their selective isolation.

Niobium extraction processes from tin slags can be divided into the following process types:

1.  Upgrading the Niobium content of the slag: separating some of the constituents by leaching (acid leaching of slag 

with 2% sulphuric acid at 50ºC).

2.  Preparing synthetic concentrate.

3.  Recovering Niobium directly from medium-grade slags.

Recycling of iron and steel scrap

Scrap is collected by scrap dealers and processed into a physical form and chemical composition that can be consumed 

by steel mills in their furnaces. Baling presses are used to compact the scrap into manageable bundles. Scrap dealers 

sort scrap materials, and steelmakers carefully purchase scrap that does not contain undesirable elements that exceed 

acceptable levels. The scrap is mainly melted in basic oxygen and electric arc furnaces (BOF and EAF). In the recycling 

of high-strength low-alloy steel, one must be aware that about 0.05% of Niobium will most likely be oxidised to the slag 


MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

phase and lost during recycling to EAF or BOF. In the fabrication of new steel products, new steel scrap with a known 

chemical composition is produced. Preparation of the new scrap for recycling is usually limited to cutting, cleaning and 

baling prior to shipment back to the steel maker [28].

Niobium and Tantalum do not represent any special risk. The solid forms of Tantalum and Niobium do not pose any 

particular environmental problems. There is no reported information on toxicity of the metals and alloys, and the only 

associated health hazards stem from the powders, which, like any other powder, can be irritants. Flotation reagents are 

generally biodegradable and the tailings are not very hazardous, as occurs for example in mine drainage[29]. The life-

cycle analysis performed by Nuss & Eckelman in 2014 shows 260 kgCO

2

eq/kg of global warming potential for Tantalum 

(considered to be a medium degree of impact), whereas for Niobium, the figure is 12.5 kgCO

2

eq/kg (lower impact). 

However, Niobium has 133 MJ eq/kg of cumulative energy demand compared to 4,360 MJ eq/kg for Tantalum. As for 

terrestrial acidification, Niobium would have low impact compared to other metals on the periodic table, while Tantalum 

would be in the middle. The same occurs for freshwater eutrophication and human toxicity. 

The minerals from which Nb and Ta are extracted are known for their significant content in naturally occurring radioactive 

materials (NORMs), especially in the cases of 226Ra, 238Ru, 232Th and 40K. NORMs. Afterwards, the raw materials are 

processed they are converted into TENORMs (technologically enhanced natural radiation materials). The environmental 

hazard is extremely intense in the case of Nigeria, where large quantities of generated tailings rich in these radioactive 

minerals are disposed of haphazardly into the environment. Radiation monitoring in the area and at some processing 

mills has revealed high dose rates with values as high as 100 aSv per hour for processed zircon. The in situ dose rate 

measurements for workers and the public at large indicated exposures significantly higher than the recommended values 

of 1 and 20 mSv/year, respectively. Niobium  ore deposits frequently contain  a number of radionuclides  at elevated 

concentrations. The release of radionuclides such as uranium and thorium could have an important impact on the local 

environment and on worker health.

Tantalum  concentrates  from  pegmatites  generally  contain  minute  quantities  of  natural  thorium  and  uranium,  but 

pose a very low radiological risk during transport, and the regulations are designed so that safety is provided through 

passive safety inherent in the package. Moreover, generation concentrates, especially those produced from alkaline and 

peralkaline deposits, will almost certainly have higher levels of these radioactive elements, and some type of on-site 

processing prior to shipment may well be required [29]. 

Ferro-Niobium production is not hazardous as on-site safety precautions are adequate [29]. Pyrochlore concentrates 

used to produce Ferro-Niobium also contain thorium and uranium, which are present in the Ferro-Niobium slag. This slag 

contains elevated levels of thorium and uranium and is generally stored on site. Despite its thorium and uranium content, 

FeNb is not included in the Best Available Techniques Reference Document for the Non-Ferrous Metals Industries, where 

it is only commented that the dust generated from the furnace is discharged to a landfill except for a certain amount of 

FeNb, and that 1.9 tons of slag is generated per ton of alloy. 

As the key to increased Tantalum capacitor efficiency is the fineness of the powder, care must be taken to ensure a static 

and ignition-free environment as, as in the cases of many other very fine powders, they are pyrophoric and may explode 

if handled improperly. Comprehensive regulation of materials is now in place in the European Union, under a protocol 

known as REACH (registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals). All companies wishing to produce 

substances in the EU or import them into the EU must ensure they meet their registration obligations if they are to continue 

with their activities; further guidance can be obtained from the European Chemical Agency website (ECHA, 2011) or 

from national authorities [29]. A life cycle analysis was performed as part of the MSP-REFRAM EU Project, comparing 

Tantalum primary extraction and the Ta secondary recovery. The results indicate that, in all categories considered, (global 

warming, cumulative energy demand, terrestrial acidification, freshwater eutrophication and human toxicity) there is 

an important gap between the impact of the secondary recovery process and the primary extractive process, with the 

effects of secondary process representing only about 15 % of primary process activities. As there is currently no primary 

production of Ta or Nb in Europe, secondary production is a good opportunity in terms of environmental impact.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACTS OF THEIR EXPLOITATION




Table  4  shows  substitutability  scores  for Tantalum  presented  by  Oakdene  Hollins  and  Fraunhofer  ISI  in  their  report 

entitled Critical Raw Materials at the EU Level in 2013. A score of “0” means the material is easily substitutable at no 

additional cost or loss in performance, while a score of “1” represents substitutable, but  with an increase in cost and loss 

in performance:

SUBSTITUTION POSSIBILITIES



Material 

Application 

Share 

Megasector 

Substitutability 

Tantalum 

Capacitors 

40% 

Electronics 

0.3 

Tantalum 

Superalloys 

21% 

Metals 

0.7 

Tantalum 

Sputtering targets 

12% 

Electronics 

1.0 

Tantalum 

Mill products 

11% 

MechEquip 

0.7 

Tantalum 

Carbides 

10% 

MechEquip 

0.3 

Tantalum 

Chemicals 

6% 

Chemicals 

1.0 

Table 4. Tantalum substitutability in different applications [30]



Thus, Tantalum substitutability according to the scores shown in Table 4, is quite simple due to the low costs of capacitors 

and carbides. In superalloys and mill products, substitutability is possible, but at a higher cost and/or with a loss in 

performance. In sputtering targets and chemicals, Tantalum is still not substitutable. Thus, Tantalum can be substituted 

by other materials but most substitutes have either higher costs or adverse properties. Distribution of end-uses and 

corresponding substitutability assessment for tantalum is presented in the figure below:

Fig. 14 Substitutability of Tantalum in its major applications [31]



Niobium was listed as one of the 21 critical raw materials for the EU in a December 2015 study conducted by Oakdene 

Hollins  Research  &  Consulting  and  Frauhofer  ISI. Table  5  provides  a  breakdown  of  Niobium  applications  with  their 

respective substitutability levels:

Application

Share

Megasector

Value (GVA)

Substitutability

Steel: Structural

31

Construction

104.4

0.7

Steel: Automotive

28

Transport – Road

147.4

0.7

Steel: Pipeline

24

Oil

50.0

0.7

Superalloys

8

Metals

164.6

0.7

Others

6

Other

63.3

0.5

Steel: Chemical 

3

Mechanical Eqpt.

182.4

0.7

Table 5 End uses, megasector assignment and substitution values [30]



MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram


MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

Figure  15  shows  the  distribution  of  Niobium  uses  and  their  substitutability  levels.  The  manner  and  scaling  of  the 

assessment is compatible with the work done by  an ad-hoc group on the definition of critical raw materials (2010):

Fig. 15 Distribution of end-uses and corresponding substitutability assessment of Niobium [31]



As seen, the substitution of Niobium and Tantalum is possible depending on the applications they are used for. . The 

following table outlines several possibilities [16-24][25]:

Metal

Application

Substitutes

Nb

HSLA Steels



Titanium, Vanadium, Molybdenum

Nb

Stainless Steels



Titanium, Tantalum, High Nitrogen 

steels


Nb

Superalloys

Ceramic Matrix Composites, Molyb-

denum, Titanium, Tantalum

Nb

Superconductors



Vanadium-Gallium alloys, BSSCO 

alloys


Ta

Capacitors

Niobium oxide, Aluminium, Ceramic

Ta

Cemented carbides



Niobium, Tungsten, Titanium car-

bides, Titanium nitride (some CRM)

Ta

Steels super-alloy 



Vanadium, Molybdenum

Ta

Super-alloys for high T applications



Hafnium, Iridium, Molybdenum, Nio-

bium, Rhenium, Tungsten (some CRM)

Ta

Process equipment, resistance to 



corrosion, high-T environment

Niobium (CRM), Glass, Platinum 

(CRM), Titanium, Zirconium

Ta

SAW filters and SAW resonators in 



electronic applications in cellphones, 

TV sets, video recording

Lanthanum gallium silicate (CRM)

Ta

Orthopaedic applications



Titanium and ceramics in some cases

Ta

Surgical equipment



Chromium/Nickel steel alloys

Ta

Optic/lenses



Niobium in some cases

Ta

Hard disk drives



Niobium 


Innovative  improvements  in  hydrometallurgical  technology  for  processing  Niobium  and  Tantalum  concentrates  is 

expected in the following areas [4]:

•  The  application  of  more  robust  extractants  with  higher  stability  and  lower  water  solubility.  A  process  for 

extracting Nb and Ta from a fluorinated leach liquor with Alamine 336, using kerosene and xylene as diluents and 

n-decanol as a modifier has been proposed. Ta extraction was higher than that of Nb [6]. High purity Tantalum and 

Tantalum-free Niobium (99.99-99.99%) can be obtained using quaternary ammonium salts as extractants from 

a hydrofluoric acid solution [12] containing various metallic impurities (alkaline or alkaline-earth metals such as 

cobalt, manganese, iron, nickel, copper, etc.). This patented process can be applied to ore concentrates as well as 

scrap containing Nb and Ta, or Ta-rich tin slags. 

•  Less  HF  or  no  HF  used  for  the  digestion  of  concentrates  and  metal  separation  using  SX.  Using  ammonium 



bifluoride as an alternative to hydrofluoric acid, the leaching process is performed with water and large amounts 

of impurities are precipitated in the form of insoluble compounds that can be separated from the solution through 

filtration. Optimum digestion conditions were determined: a tantalite-to-bifluoride mass ratio of 1:30, a reaction 

temperature of 250 °C and a reaction time of 3 h. Under these conditions, the leach recoveries of Niobium and 

Tantalum were 95% and 98.5% respectively [11].

•  Recycling reagents used as much as possible to reduce liquid and solid wastes



More specifically, Niobium and Tantalum extraction techniques for secondary resources research has been done on:

•  Extraction of Niobium and Tantalum from Tin slag: chlorination at 1000ºC has allowed the extraction of about 



84%  and  65%  of  the  Nb  and Ta  compounds,  respectively.  Carbochlorination  at  500ºC  has  allowed  complete 

extraction and recovery of both compounds [7].

•  Niobium  and  Tantalum  from  Copper  Smelting  slag:  physical  separation  by  froth  flotation  is  widely  used. 



Hydroxamates are powerful collectors in flotation due to their ability to selectively chelate on the surfaces of 

minerals that contain Niobium [8].

•  Tantalum extraction from concentrates: a novel hydrometallurgical process was developed to selectively extract 



Nb and Ta from Nb–Ti–Fe raw concentrates, by forming a sodium hexaniobate through a reaction between the 

initial  concentrate  and  concentrated  NaOH  at  atmospheric  pressure  [9]. After  caustic  conversion,  the  sodium 

hexaniobates are selectively dissolved in water.

•  Tantalum from alloy scrap: iodization of alloy scrap produces volatile tantalum (V) iodides that can be reduced in 



a plasma furnace to produce high surface area tantalum metal powder precursors, which, after being annealed, 

yield high-purity nano-powders with uniform particle size distribution, low oxygen content, and high surface area 

and capacitance [10].

•  Tantalum  from  electronic waste:  use  of  ionic  liquids  at  room  temperature  concurrently with  the  extractants, 



containing  either  the  chelating  ligands  or  task-specific  ionic  liquids  (TSILs)  that  have  a  strong  affinity  and/or 

selectivity with  the target metal  and as purification agents through a selective electrodeposition  process[13]. 

Also, oxidation in the air of the scraps followed by a mechanical collection of the sintered Ta electrodes inside the 

scraps in combination with chemical treatment allows high purity Ta

2

O

5

 recovery, by reducing the Ta

2

O

5

 obtained 

through magnesiothermic reduction [14].

•  Niobium from steel scrap: Niobium has a recycled content higher than 50%. Niobium is eventually reintroduced 



into the steel-making process, which makes the recycling of Niobium relatively easy [15].

HEADING TOWARDS THE FUTURE: RECENT RESEARCH ACTIVITIES



MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram


EUROPEAN RELATED PROJECTS

•  OptiMore: optimizes the crushing, milling and separation ore processing technologies for Tungsten and Tantalum 



mineral processing, by means of improved, fast and flexible fine tuning production process control based on new 

software models, advanced sensing and a more thorough study of the physical process, which increases by 7-12% 

over  the  best  current  production  processes,  increasing  energy  savings  by  5%  compared  to  the  best  available 

techniques.

•  E4-CritMat (Marie Curie programme): Engineering of Energy Efficient Extraction of Critical Materials – Application 



to the Processing of Niobium and Tantalum Minerals.

MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram


[1] Roskill, THE ECONOMICS OF NIOBIUM, Eleventh Edition, 2009

[2] D. Arcos, AMPHOS 21, Nb_Ta_mining_state of the art D_Arcos-V1.pptx, presentation from WS1 in Barcelona, May, 30-31st , 2016

[3] S. Casanovas, AMPHOS, Mapping_of_secondary_Nb_resources_(EOL_products) S_Casanovas_V1.pptx, presentation 

from WS1 in Barcelona, May, 30-31st, 2016      

[4] Extraction from Eurostat databasis “EU Trade Since 1999 by HS2,4,6 and CN8 (daily updated) “ website, based on 

CN8 codes, http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/newxtweb

[5] Audion A.S., Piantone P., Panorama 2011 du marché du tantale (in French), report BRGM/RP-61343-FR, 2012

[6 ]El hussaini O. M.; Rice N. M. (2004) Liquid-liquid extraction of niobium and tantalum from aqueous sulphate/

fluoride solutions by a tertiary amine, Hydrometallurgy, 72, 259-267.

[7] I. Gaballah, E. Allain, and M. Djona, Extraction of Tantalum and Niobium from Tin Slags by Chlorination and 

Carbochlorination, Metallurgical and Materials Transaction B, volume 28B, June 1997—359-369.

[8] S. Roy, A. Datta et S. Rehani, Flotation of copper sulphide from copper smelter slag using multiple collectors and 

their mixtures, International journal of mineral processing, vol. 143, pp. 43-49, 2015.

[9] Gauthier J.-P. Deblonde, Valérie Weigel, Quentin Bellier, Romaric Houdard, Florent Delvallée, Sarah Bélair, Denis 

Beltrami, Selective recovery of niobium and tantalum from low-grade concentrates using a simple and fluoride-free 

process, Separation and Purification Technology 162 (2016) 180–187

[10] Joseph D. Lessard, Leonid Shekhter, Daniel Gribbin, Larry F. McHugh. A new technology platform for the 

production of electronic grade tantalum nanopowders from tantalum scrap sources. International Journal of Refractory 

Metals and Hard Materials 48:408-413 · January 2015

[11] Kabangu, M. J. and P. L. Crouse (2012). "Separation of niobium and tantalum from Mozambican tantalite by 

ammonium bifluoride digestion and octanol solvent extraction." Hydrometallurgy 129: 151-155.

[12] Niwa, K.; Ichikawa, I. ; Motone, M. (1987). “Method of separating and purifying tantalum and niobium-containing 

compounds.” Patent JP82487/86; EP0241278.

[13] Matsuoka, R., Mineta, K., & Okabe, T. H. (2004). Recycling process for tantalum and some other Reactive Metal 

Scraps. In the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society [TMS] (Ed.), Proceedings of the Symposium on Solid and Aqueous 

Waste from Non-ferrous Metal Industries (pp. 689-696). Charlotte: TMS.

[14] http://www.agence-nationale-recherche.fr/?Projet=ANR-13-CDII-0010

[15] Worrel, E. & Reuter, M.,2014,"Handbook of Recycling: State of the art for Practitioners, Analysts  and Scientists", Newnes, pp 74-75

[16] RPA, 2012. Study on data needs for a full raw materials flow analysis. Prepared for Directorate – General 

Enterprise and Industry. London, UK Risk and Policy analysis limited.

[17] BGS 2011. Mineral profile: Tungsten

[18] Argus 2016. An overvirew of downstream Tungsten markets. Argus Metal Pages Forum, Tokyo.

[19] EUROSTAT DATABASE http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/database

[20] European Commission 2014. Report on critical raw materials for the EU. Report of the Ad-hoc working group on 

defining critical raw materials. European Commssion.

[21] BGS 2012. Risk list 2012- Current supply risk for chemical elements or element groups which are of economic value.

[22] BGS 2015. Risk list 2015- Current supply risk for chemical elements or element groups which are of economic value.

[23] Krebs, Robert E. The history and use of our earth's chemical elements: a reference guide. Greenwood Publishing 

Group, 2006. ISBN: 9780313334382

[24] Chapman, A., et al. "Study on Critical Raw Materials at EU Level." Oakdene Hollins: Buckinghamshire, UK (2013).

[25] CRM_InnoNet: Substitution of Critical Raw Materials. “Critical Raw Materials Substitution Profiles”. September 

2013. Revised May 2015. Accessed Online: October 2016. Link: http://www.criticalrawmaterials.eu/wp-content/

uploads/D3.3-Raw-Materials-Profiles-final-submitteddocument.pdf

[26] E. Commission, “Report on Critical Raw Materials for the EU,” European Commission, 2015.

[27] D1.1 “Current and future needs of selected refractory metals in EU” MSP REFRAM EU H2020 project

[28] D4.2 “State of the art on the recovery of refractory metals from urban mines” MSP-Refram project EU H2020.

[29]  Critical Metal Handbook, First Edition, Edited by Gus Gunn. Chapter 15 “Tantalum and Niobium” by Robert 

Linnen, Dave Trueman and Richard Burt. 2014

[30] Chapman, A., et al “Study on Critical Raw Materials at EU Level” Oakdene Hollins: Buckinghamshire, UK (2013)

[31] CRM_InnoNet: Substitution of Critical Raw Materials. “Critical Raw Materials Substitution Profiles”. September 

2013. Revised May 2015. Accessed Online: October 2016. Link: http://www.criticalrawmaterials.eu/wp-content/

uploads/D3.3-Raw-Materials-Profiles-final-submitted-document.pdf 

MSP-REFRAM has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 

research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 688993.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE!



http://prometia.eu/msp-refram

REFERENCES



Kataloq: wp-content -> uploads -> 2014
2014 -> «xalqların psixologiyası»
2014 -> Yeni tanı almış hastada ilk danışmanlık, anamnez, muayene ve laboratuar testleri
2014 -> “Azərkosmos” Açıq Səhmdar Cəmiyyətinin Nizamnaməsinin və strukturunun təsdiq edilməsi haqqında
2014 -> Journey to Sacred India
2014 -> Qrup liderinin rol və funksiyaları, liderin mənimsədiyi nəzəri yanaşmadan, liderlik tərzindən və liderlik bacarıqlarından, aldığı təhsildən, etik qaydalara uyğun davranıb davranmayışından, şəxsiyyəti və fərdi xüsusiyyətlərindən təsirlənir
2014 -> Mühazirə Tarix, elm və fəlsəfə. Anlayışlar və ideyalar Keçmiş və Tarix
2014 -> Kişisel arzu, istek ve ihtiyaçları için ürünleri satın alan ya da satın alma kapasitesinde olan gerçek kişidir
2014 -> Lt scientific
2014 -> Microsoft Word Konflikt Gruppen Manus Q. doc
2014 -> Yazılı Bacarıqlar (yazma- oxuma)

Yüklə 136,8 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə