Fedor petrovich litke and his expeditions to novaya zemlya



Yüklə 1,69 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/14
tarix19.07.2018
ölçüsü1,69 Mb.
#56890
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14


1

The Journal of the Hakluyt Society

     December 2017

Fedor Petrovich Litke and his Expeditions to Novaya Zemlya 

1821-24

by William Barr



Abstract

Having distinguished himself as senior midshipman on board Vasiliy Mikhailovich Golovnin’s



Kamchatka during the latter’s round-the-world cruise in 1817-19, in 1821 at the age of only 23,

Leytenent Fedor Petrovich Litke was selected by the Russian Navy Department to lead an

expedition to survey the coasts of Novaya Zemlya, and also the mainland coast from the White

Sea west to the Russian-Norwegian border. While Litke was entirely successful in executing

this latter part of his orders, he was less successful in surveying Novaya Zemlya. In the brig

Novaya Zemlya, over four consecutive seasons (1821-4), he succeeded despite his best efforts

in surveying only parts of the west coast of the double-island due to persistently late-surviving

sea ice. He was unable to penetrate north of Mys Nassau and thus was unable to reach Mys

Zhelaniya the northern tip of Novaya Zemlya, and while he was able to send boats through

Matochkin Shar to survey that strait, he was unable to reach any part of the east coast. The

contrast with the present situation, whereby the route north of Novaya Zemlya  in ice-free

waters is commonly used by vessels proceeding from the Barents Sea to the Kara Sea, is an

interesting commentary on changing sea-ice conditions. 



Early career

Fedor Petrovich Litke’s family was German in origin. His grandfather, Johann Philipp Lütke

(Ivan Filippovich Litke), a Lutheran pastor, moved from Germany to St Petersburg in 1735 to

take up the position of co-rector of the Academy of Science’s  gimnaziya (high school)

1

. His


second  son  Petr  Ivanovich   pursued   a  military   career,   but  in   June  1795  he   was  appointed

Councilor of Customs in St Petersburg. In the interim, on 15 December 1784 he had married

Anna Ivanovna Engel. The latter gave birth to Fedor Petrovich on 17 September 1797,

2

  but



unfortunately died from complications associated with his birth. Being left with five young

children, ranging in age from twelve years to a few hours, Petr Ivanovich arranged for his

mother-in-law, Elizaveta Kasperovna Engel, then living in Kiev, to move to St Petersburg to

look after his children. Then, a year after Anna’s death Petr Ivanovich married seventeen-year-

old Yekaterina Andreyevna Pal’m whom Orlov has described as Fedor Petrovich’s ‘evil, cruel

stepmother’.

3

In 1804, at the age of seven, Fedor Petrovich was sent to a boarding school run by Efim



Khristoforovich   Meyer,   who   was   a   firm   believer   in   corporal   punishment.   Alekseev   has

described   Fedor   Petrovich   at   this   stage   as   ‘badly   developed   physically,   fearful,   shy   and

unresourceful’.

4

 But then on 8 March 1808 Petr Ivanovich died, and two months later Fedor



Petrovich’s grandmother Elizaveta Kasperovna also died. The family got together and decided

that the children should be distributed among various of the family members. Fedr Petrovich

was taken out of boarding school and sent to live with his uncle, Fedor Ivanovich Engel. The

1

 Alekseev, Fedor Petrovich Like, p.1; Orlov, ‘Fedor Petrovich Litke’p. 7.



2

 This and all other dates are according to the Julian calendar. To derive the Gregorian date add 11 days.

3

 Orlov, ‘Fedor Petrovich Litke’, p. 7.



4

 Alekseev, Fedor Petrovich Litkep. 5




2

latter ignored young Fedor Petrovich almost completely, but on the other hand he was given

free access to his uncle’s extensive library. He read voraciously, if in rather a disorganized

fashion.   This   somewhat   irregular   education   was   further   enhanced   by   listening   to   the

distinguished   guests   who   attended   Fedor   Ivanovich   Engel’s   dinner   parties   on   Monday

evenings. 

But  then   on  29  June   1810  Fedor  Petrovich’s  sister,  Natalya,   married   naval   officer

Kapitan-leytenant Ivan Savvich Sul’menev and he moved with them to Kronshtadt where Ivan

Savvich was stationed. A very close relationship developed between Fedor Petrovich and his

uncle. He enjoyed the trip out to Kronshtadt immensely and spent many hours exploring the

naval base. He also listened avidly to conversations between his uncle and naval friends, about

the sea, ships and naval battles.

Figure 1. Fedor Litke, 4 December 1823. Portrait painted at Arkhangel’sk.

Ivan Savvich was transferred to Sveaborg (Suomenlinna), the fortress and naval base

just off Helsinki, and, along with Natalya Petrovna and Fedor Petrovich travelled there on

board the frigate Pollux – Fedor Petrovich’s first voyage on board a naval vessel. By this time

it had been decided that he was heading for a naval career. To enter the Navy at the usual age

Fedor Ivanovich Engel would have had to enrol him in the Naval Corps several years earlier,

but had failed to do so. With Sul’menev’s encouragement, Fedor Petrovich started studying for

the Naval Corp’s entrance exams on his own – with the help of tutors organized by his uncle.




3

His exam was an oral one, the examiners being officers who knew his uncle. He passed the

exam   and   on   23   April   1813   he   joined   the   Navy   as   a   naval   cadet   (gardemarin).

5

  Almost



immediately he found himself on active service; on 9 May he was on board the galiot Aglaya,

one of 21 gunboats under the command of Sul’menev, who flew his broad pennant on board

that vessel when he led his little flotilla first to Riga and then to Danzig (Gdansk), held by the

French.


6

 Initially the gunboats were stationed in the Putziger Vik (Zatoka Pukka) but then on

21 and 23 August and 4 September they attacked the batteries at the mouth of the Wista

(Vistula) River while Russian and Prussian troops attacked the city. Fedor Petrovich was in

charge of a launch carrying Sul’menev’s orders, under fire, to each of the gunboats engaged in

the attack. For his performance he was awarded the Order of Sv. Anna, Fourth Class. Then, on

23 September he was promoted Mishman (Midshipman), still only 15 years old.

7

 



After spending the winter in Königsberg (Kaliningrad) and St Petersburg, in mid-June

1814 Litke returned to Sveaborg on board Aglaya. He spent most of the winter of 1814-15 in St

Petersburg, staying with the Sul’menevs, then was back in Sveaborg for the following winter.

On   Sul’menev’s   recommendation   Fedor   Petrovich’s   next   appointment   was   to   the   frigate



Kamchatka, which was to undertake a round-the-world cruise under the command of Vasiliy

Mikhailovich Golovnin. Litke was the senior midshipman on board, the others being Ferdinand

Petrovich Vrangel’ and Fedor Fedorovich Matyushkin, both of whom became lifelong friends

of Litke, and who, by coincidence would later be engaged in surveying the coasts of the East

Siberian Sea at the same time that Litke was mounting expeditions to Novaya Zemlya. 

Kamchatka  put   to   sea   from   Kronshtadt   on   26   August   1817.

8

  After   calling   at



Copenhagen, Portsmouth (from where Litke visited London for a few days) and Rio de Janeiro,

and having taken about a month to round Cape Horn due to its notorious westerly gales, the

frigate reached Callao on 7 February 1818. From there Litke visited Lima. Putting to sea again

on 27 February Kamchatka headed north and west, reaching Petropavlovsk-na-Kamchatke on 3

May. Sailing again on 19 June the frigate next called at Kodiak en route to Novo-Arkhangel’sk

(now Sitka); along the way Litke and his fellow officers surveyed the Komandorskiye Ostrova,

Attu and others of the Aleutian Islands. The frigate reached Novo-Arkhangel’sk, the capital of

Russian America on 28 July. Although he probably did not learn of it until Kamchatka returned

to Kronstadt, on 26 July 1818 Litke had been promoted to Leytenant. 

Sailing   from   Novo-Arkhangel’sk   again,   after   a   brief   stop   at   Fort   Ross   the   frigate

continued south to Monterey. Putting to sea again on 18 September, after another brief stop at

Fort Ross Kamchatka headed southwest, bound for the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii). There, her

first stop was at Hawaii (the Big Island) where Litke went ashore at Kealakekua Bay where

Captain James Cook had been murdered only 40 years earlier. The next stop was Honolulu on

Oahu, from where the frigate sailed again on 30 October. After calling at Guam  Kamchatka

next headed for Manila in the Philippines, arriving on 13 December. Her stay here was quite

long   –   until   17   January   1820,   the   time   being   used   for   repairs,   caulking   and   painting   in

preparation for the long voyage home. Via Sunda Strait and the Cape of Good Hope, with no

intermediate stops the frigate reached St Helena on 20 March. Since Napoleon Bonaparte was

still a prisoner there, security was tight and only Golovnin and one of the cadets was allowed

ashore. The visit was brief, with the frigate putting to sea again on 22 March. After a short stop

5

 Orlov, ‘Fedor Petrovich Litke’, p. 8.



6

 Alekseev, Fedor Petrovich Litke, p. 12.

7

 ibid, p. 14.



8

 ibid, p. 21.





Yüklə 1,69 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə